Make a deal with Gephisto

Mathieu Jacomy and Anders Munk, TANT Lab & Public Data Lab

6 minutes read

Make a deal with Gephisto

Gephisto is Gephi in one click. You give it network data, and it gives you a visualization. No settings. No skills needed. The dream! With a twist.

Gephisto produces visualizations such as the one above. It exists as a website, and you can just try it below. It includes test networks, you don’t even need one. Do it! Try it, and come back here. Then we talk about it.

https://jacomyma.github.io/gephisto/

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“Algorithm Trouble” entry in A New AI Lexicon

 A short piece on “Algorithm Trouble” for AI Now Institute‘s A New AI Lexicon, written by Axel Meunier (Goldsmiths, University of London), Jonathan Gray (King’s College London) and Donato Ricci (médialab, Sciences Po, Paris). The full piece is available here, and here’s an excerpt:

“For decades, social researchers have argued that there is much to be learned when things go wrong.¹ In this essay, we explore what can be learned about algorithms when things do not go as anticipated, and propose the concept of algorithm trouble to capture how everyday encounters with artificial intelligence might manifest, at interfaces with users, as unexpected, failing, or wrong events. The word trouble designates a problem, but also a state of confusion and distress. We see algorithm troubles as failures, computer errors, “bugs,” but also as unsettling events that may elicit, or even provoke, other perspectives on what it means to live with algorithms — including through different ways in which these troubles are experienced, as sources of suffering, injustice, humour, or aesthetic experimentation (Meunier et al., 2019). In mapping how problems are produced, the expression algorithm trouble calls attention to what is involved in algorithms beyond computational processes. It carries an affective charge that calls upon the necessity to care about relations with technology, and not only to fix them (Bellacasa, 2017).”

“Ways of Listening to Forests” workshop at Critical Zones exhibition, ZKM, 26th November 2021

There will be a free online workshop on 26th November 2021 featuring our forest listening project as part of the Critical Zones exhibition curated by Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel at the ZKM Center for Art and Media. This builds on a previous workshop in the summer. The sound pieces are now online as part of the Critical Zones exhibition and can be downloaded from the project website.

This piece is cross-posted from jonathangray.org.